Timeline

This timeline will expand as the podcast goes along!

1977

Feb

  • Initial planning of a VCS replacement. Joe Decuir and Jay Miner started the hardware development to replace the VCS by sometime in 1979

  • George McLeod designed the CTIA

  • Doug Neubauer designed POKEY (POtentiometers and KEYboard interface, and oh it did some sound too)

  • Joe Decuir designed the SIO interface (Atari wanted slots but FCC had strict rules about shielding for home devices: (from http://www.atarimuseum.com/articles/joedecuir.html):

    Atari was dealing with the FCC under the Part 15 Type I rules, for anything
    that actually generated TV channel RF.  Those radiation rules were much
    stricter then the Class A and Class B rules that common computers must meet,
    so slots were out, and we ended up wrapping the electronics in a 2mm thick
    aluminum casting.  The serial bus was our way of adding peripherals.  (It was
    also a very expensive one.  I think it sank the product.) Meanwhile, Apple was
    dodging the FCC, by not including the RF modulator themselves.  You had to buy
    it from someone else and install it yourself.
    

1978

December

  • Atari announces the Atari 400 and 800 personal computers.
    • OS developed by Alan Miller, Larry Kaplan, Bob Whitehead, and David Crane

1979

January

  • Demoed at the Winter CES

October

November

  • First ads appeared (Byte) 400: US$549, 800: US$999

1980

March

December

  • sold 35000 computers (gamasutra)

1981

January

May

  • Atari announces the 8KB Atari 400 is being discontinued, 16k memory will be standard at a list price of US$399
  • ANALOG Magazine moves to quarterly publication

1982

Unsure

January

  • Atari begins shipping all Atari 800 units with GTIA graphics chips, allowing modes 9, 10, and 11 with up to 16 colors per scan line

September

  • ANALOG Magazine returns to bi-monthly publication

December

1983

January

  • Atari introduces the 1200XL home computer.

April

  • Antic magazine begins monthly publication

May

  • Atari offers a US$100 rebate on the Atari 800, bringing its retail price to below US$400.

June

August

October

1983: June - Atari introduces the Atari 600 XL. 1983: June - Atari introduces the Atari 800 XL, with 64 KB RAM. 1983: June - Atari introduces the Atari 1450 XL, with built-in 300 bps modem. 1983: June - Atari introduces the Atari 1450 XLD, with built-in 300 bps modem and disk drive.

November

1984

May

  • Hi-Res magazine final issue

July

  • Jack Tramiel, Former President of Commodore International, buys the Atari console and home computer divisions

1985

January

  • Atari introduces the 65XE (64K RAM) for US$199
  • Atari introduces the 130XE (128K RAM) for US$299

February

  • ROM magazine final issue

May

1988

Jan

  • Wargame coverage in Page 6: lots of reviews of wargames

May

  • Compute! magazine drops Atari 8-bit coverage